Gaylord Dold Author of The Mitch Roberts Series and More - page 3

Ray Bradbury–The Unconscious as Playroom

Back some thirty years ago I sat down to my typewriter one day and wrote these words: “The Playroom.” Playroom where? The Past? No. The Present? Hardly. The Future? Yes! Well, then, what would a Playroom in some future year be like? I began typing,…

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Ray Bradbury–Tenacity and the Muse

The Muse must have a shape. You will write a thousand words a day for ten or twenty years in order to try to give it shape, to learn enough about grammar and story construction so that these become part of the Subconscious, without restraining…

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Annie Dillard–Reading and the Spiritual Life

Why are we reading, if not in hope of beauty laid bare, life heightened and is deepest mystery probed? Can the writer isolate and vivify all in experience that most deeply engages our intellects and our hearts? Can the writer renew our hope for literary…

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Annie Dillard–The Freedom of Writing; and, the Slavery too.

Putting a book together is interesting and exhilarating. It is sufficiently difficult and complex that it engages all your intelligence. It is life at its most free.   Your freedom as a writer is not freedom of expression in the sense of wild blurting; you may…

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Annie Dillard–The Two Stacks, Good and Bad

Several delusions weaken the writer’s resolve to throw away work. If he has read his pages too often, those pages will have a necessary quality, the ring of the inevitable, like poetry known by heart. They will perfectly answer their own familiar rhythms. He will…

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The Silk Roads: A New History of the World by Peter Francopan

The Silk Roads: A New History of the World, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 2016 (645pp. illus., $30). At the height of its splendor in the era A.D. 650-800, Baghdad was a magnificent city, its parks, gardens, schools, hospitals, charitable foundations, mosques and bathhouses “lavishly…

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Annie Dillard–Quiet, Poet at Work

Writing a book, full time, takes between two and ten years. The long poem, John Berryman said, takes between five and ten years…Flaubert wrote steadily, with only the usual appalling strains. For twenty-five years he finished a big book every five to seven years…On plenty…

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Shrinking the Earth: The Rise and Decline of American Abundance by Donald Worster

Worster, Donald. Shrinking the Earth: The Rise and Decline of American Abundance, Oxford University Press, New York, 2016 (265pp.$27.95). Kansas has reason to be proud of Donald Worster, one of America’s foremost environmental historians. As a distinguished professor at the University of Kansas for more…

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Annie Dillard–Adapting Yourself to the Art

The body of literature, with its limits and edges, exists outside some people and inside others. Only after the writer lets literature shape her can she perhaps shape literature. In working-class France, when an apprentice got hurt, or when he got tired, the experienced workers…

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Michael Herr Dies on June 23, 2016: News from the War

Michael Herr died last June 23, 2016, a sad day.  Herr’s book “Dispatches” was the only true news from the war I remember.  I was subject to the draft during the War, fought not in Vietnam but in the streets of the United States, and…

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